Archive

V2 Resources

121014_ANGELA

[D6 2012]
The traditional notion of the ‘Garden City’ has become increasingly obsolete in contemporary times and post- earthquake Christchurch serves as a unique opportunity to question and push architectural design related to the green belt.

Research into Christchurch ecosystems reveal a strong dependency between native plant and native bird species which have participated in mutualistic co-evolution in the isolated condition of New Zealand. This attraction between species has given way to Swarm logic as a possible means of organization of architecture. In a similar fashion to native birds being attracted to native plants, behavioural agents may seek certain local conditions and interact with one another to organize the collective gesture from a bottom up approach. By defining laws of interrelations and coding behavior sensitive to site, an architecture derived from these complex dependencies can emerge, free of the influence of empty traditions.

The project centred at the heart of Christchurch is aimed at providing housing for the influx of workers who come to the city as part of the rebuild. At a crucial time for Christchurch, unique ideas appropriate for the new city emerging from disaster should be considered.

Angela Yoo, October 2012
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121014_HANNAH

[D6 2012]
Located on the outskirts of the proposed condensed CBD, bordered by the Avon River and the Christchurch Art Gallery, the proposal is for a mixed use building that facilitates a connection between the public and small businesses involved in the rebuild. The project aims to integrate several urban environments, office spaces, artist studios, retail, cafes, public space and native vegetation, encouraging the symbiotic relationships which allow these programs to bring life into urban spaces, while maintaining their individual identities. Through early investigations into the native vegetation of Christchurch the network of ecosystems highlighted the importance of interdependent structures and systems in the natural environment. This notion influenced the building concept from form to program focusing on the connections between the multiplicity of structures and environments.

The project attempts to allow the notion of a garden city to reemerge through creating an environment where nature and architecture are intrinsically connected. Seeing a ‘frame’ as a restrictive boundary the proposal incorporates green spaces into its built fabric providing a way to extend the garden city notion beyond the restraints of the CBD. Alongside Swarm Housing and The Plant Science Park these proposals create the opportunity for a green axis to extend the garden city without bounds.

Conceptually a drawing, derived from a study of the manuka ecosystem, informed the buildings programmatic layout, circulation and massing assessing each structures inherent qualities to derive its placement and interpretation. Through the differences in kind and organization new environments emerge allowing programs to interact and influence each other. The multiplicity of programs and structures establishes diversity, while their dependencies allow for a fusion between each instead of a collage of isolated unconnected events. This process recognizes how a city works as a collective and interprets it at the smaller scale of a single site.

Hannah Steenson, October 2012
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121014_WOOMIN

[D6 2012]
The Christchurch city development blueprint release marks not only the start of a ‘framework’ but another set of questions: how does it measure up not only against international standards but for the reality of the everyday citizens? Is it enough to secure a city voyaging into the 21st century? How exactly will the major parts of the ‘planned’ precincts turn out architecturally for people to experience?

This project aims to address these questions by designing part of the designated ‘Green Frame’ of the blueprint. Situated next to Latimer Square, the proposal calls for a plant science research facility. Advancing on the proposed idea of the Green Frame giving to public use, the research facility attempts to closely tie together two user groups of scientist-researchers along with the general public. In this way, the research facility is a park and the park is the research facility – allowing for mutual benefit.

The concept is derived from a close study of roots and how they play multi-functional roles. When a root sets themselves into soil, they change the ground condition with their interaction; that is, they makes a soil devoid of life capable of sustaining a system of life around it. This idea along with the geometry of the multi-axis root system became the strategy for the design: the building would be ‘fragmented’ into smaller laboratories which were interconnected to each other by the ‘paths’ just like the roots. Circulation, therefore, defines the building form: this allows for a closer interaction for the forms and the journeying along the site. Exchanges and chance encounters between the scientist-researchers, along with the public, are intended to improve innovation and collaboration. That is, the design is a network of buildings embedded into the garden of plants showcasing the research and plants of Canterbury and the agricultural plants for both the public and scientists.

Thus the design offers a new opportunity for the ‘Green Frame’ closely relating to the economic activities around Christchurch and with long-term plan in which a deeper understanding of plants can be enjoyed by both public and scientists, furthering a more co-inhabitance between plants and the built environment.

Woo-Min Lee, October 2012
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121014_SOLAR

[D6 2012]
The new CCDU plan shows precincts dedicated to different types of ‘functions’. But does the new city plan for Christchurch need to be zoned this way? Or zoned at all? Our proposal is for a small self-sustaining city block that joins work play and live. The idea is to plant this prototype then allow it to grow and spread throughout the city. The live + work + play scheme allows people to access all three within walking distance from destination to destination. These three functions have been connected together with green paths that cut across the site and multifunctional blocks that overlap the different functions. Our site is located within the green belt. The green belt reinforces the Christchurch reputation of being the Garden City. But instead of just a green empty piece of land, our proposal is for architecture and green to have a symbiotic relationship.

The Garden City plan that Christchurch was founded on and the recently proposed CCDU blueprint is similar in that they are based on the idea of separation. The Garden City separated green from city and the CCDU separates various urban activities into precincts. These planned distinct areas and hence planned separation, further separates, and discourages chance happening and occurrence, the diverse and simultaneous events of an urban fabric. In this strategy we proposing to take one block and allow for multiple programmes, allowing to prototype not only the individual function but also shared spaces.

Live: Temporary and Permanent housing for workers around the site.
Work: Office that attract business opportunities.
Play: Revitalizing the well-being of future Christchurch.


121014_LILY

Live
The building masses within the block were derived from solar analysis and the many solar studies. The forms have been morphed and angled to optimize solar access on its surface. The building form is cut in the middle to create a central garden to bring more light into the middle of the building, and to connect to the green path. The rebuilding of Christchurch has opened up many job opportunities, as many workers throughout NZ are moving into Christchurch to be a part of the rebuild. Christchurch city has many suburban 3 bedroom housing, but there is not enough accommodation for single housing, or temporary housing. My project will be housing for the workers who are planning to stay temporarily in Christchurch, or are planning to buy a larger home in Christchurch, but need a temporary place to stay. My residential apartment block consists of 1 bedroom and 2 bedroom apartments, with two public living areas on each floor.

Guangshan Lily Pan, October 2012
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Work
The Innovation Office fulfills the work component of the city. Office buildings encourage the return and growth of workers and businesses in the city. This building in particular fosters New Zealand’s small and medium enterprises, particularly in IT, a high value industry. Offices often require large open plan spaces, allowing for flexibility. These generic spaces produce non-space. Current technology allows for greater flexibility for workers, which means they are not bound to their desk nor even to the office, an employee has the ability to work almost anywhere on portable devices. In the IT workplace there is a need for collaboration at times and privacy at others. Especially with present technology one can work in any space, however the office still plays a vital role in fostering and creating spaces for physical meeting and collaboration. With a high priority for these collaborative shared spaces, these spaces are defined and fixed, facilitated by column spacing. The remaining open plan can be used for flexible offices. The plan allows for individual spaces when needed through the use of sweeping curtains, and in some instances there are fixed enclosed spaces that can be used for private meetings or conversations.

Jeffrey Jiang, October 2012
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121014_YOUNG-2

Young Hun Kim, October 2012
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121014_STONE-SITE

[D6 2012]
This project seeks to renovate the Christchurch Arts Centre which was damaged in the recent earthquakes. The Arts Centre is one of the most important heritage sites in Christchurch and for this reason the approach taken aims to respect the historical nature of the site. The Art Center is a collection of buildings ranging from over a century of construction. In keeping with this the team is proposing new buildings that speaks to the architecture of the past and present.

Damage caused by the earthquakes was often most severe where separate structures where joined. Our team is proposing a strategy for historical renovation that would remove the structures joining different buildings, and insert new timber structure to set apart the different buildings, the added benefit would be to minimise damage in future earthquakes.

When studying the site, it became clear to us that the west side of the Arts Centre has what appears to be an unfinished courtyard. Through analysing the evolution of the building site we decided it was possible to complete the courtyard culture by inserting new buildings.

The past programmes gave the Arts Centre its cultural value: local arts and crafts, shops, weekend market, cinema, studios and offices to name a few. The proposed building programs are in keeping with the history of the Arts Centre culture, as it has continually adapted programmatically over time.


121014_QIANZI

Artists in Residence
For my proposed building I am designing an artist in residence programs. The building will provide a place to research, present and produce art work of all kinds. It will also allow individuals to explore their practices within another community; meeting new people, using new materials, experiencing life in a new location. The art residencies emphasize the importance of meaningful and multi-layered cultural exchange and immersion into another culture and in return will enrich the arts culture in Christchurch.

Our team’s initial research began with an in-depth study into stone – a tradition material used for the Arts Centre and in Christchurch. For my proposed building design I developed an investigation of the stone’s colors and texture.

Qianzi Chen, October 2012
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Cinema & Performance
For my project I am proposing a theatre for performance, dance and film. The cinema and performance proposal targets the local community, at the same time it acknowledges the past programmes and the events that have shaped the City, it also will contribute to revitalising the Arts Centre once it reopens. The facility include: Cinema A and B, both are multi-functional and can be used as a concert hall, a theatre and conference centre; a multi- functional hall which can be used as a ball room or wedding venue. This is a move to bring back Christchurch’s liveliness by bring people together, as well as creating job opportunities.

Our team’s initial research began with an in-depth study into stone – a tradition material used for the Arts Centre and in Christchurch. For my proposed building design I developed an investigation of the three types of dry stacking stone walls which include boulder wall, double wall and Cornish hedge.

Tessa Yichen Song, October 2012
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121014_WEIAN

Market Courtyard
For my proposed building I am designing new shops and an outdoor market. The buildings will provide spaces for high end shops as well as an outside cloister which creates the infrastructure to allow for stalls to be set up on the weekends and on holidays.

Our team’s initial research began with an in-depth study into stone – a tradition material used for the Arts Centre and in Christchurch. For my proposed building design I developed a formal language from looking at patterns created in stone which led me to looking at formations in sand.

Weian Chen, October 2012
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121014_SOPHIA

[D6 2012]
Christchurch has lost an estimated 6,000 houses due to the 2010-2011 earthquakes. With projections of 36,000 workers expected to move to the city for the rebuild, there is a very real and urgent housing crisis. Cambridge Terrace is located along the Avon River and is still, two years after the earthquakes, within the CBD closed cordon. Many buildings have been demolished while others fate is pending. With a vast area of the neighbourhood having to be rebuilt, this site was selected for the potential to revitalise the riverside. The proposal is for a multi-unit residential complex with a focus on connecting the river with the neighbourhood.

This proposal evolved from investigations on water supply and treatment methods and led on to experimentations with porosity and flow. These studies were carried out through sponge absorption testings and informed the building concept and inspired the overall design form to be canyon-like volumes. The buildings are lifted 24metres above ground to share the same maximum height of the neighbouring buildings.

The design intends to integrate public life of the street with private spaces and examine the relationship between these different programmes. In order to do this the arrangement of the buildings is focused on enhancing connections between public and private. The idea of porosity was also incorporated into how the buildings met the ground, these spaces have permeable surfaces that allow light, noise and smells to filter through. In response to the urgency for single to small household dwellings, the target market is focused on young single households, couples without children, and the working population in the trade area.

Sophia Kim, October 2012
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121014_NATALEE

[D6 2012]
Rivers have long been regarded as a place for habitation for mankind as it traditionally provided the necessities of water, food and transportation. However, rivers nowadays have lost their purpose and have become inactive green spaces or unattractive channels for waste. My design proposal is to revitalize the Avon River, particularly in relationship to the CBD, making it highly accessible to the public. My programme involves a vibrant outdoor market place on the riverfront in between Cambridge Terrace and Oxford Terrace.

Using the notion of “filtration” to inform my design, I’ve repurposed the river with an undulating roofscape of individual funnel like buildings of various scales and materials. The market includes a large auditorium space with a side cafe and office, large stall halls, small kiosks, toilets, and canopied seating areas.

The market is solely a pedestrian area, accessible from east and west ends where the bus stops are situated. A bridge cuts across the Avon River form west to east like an extended grid to make the site directly accessible. Visitors can decide to take direct routes or weave through the stalls. The buildings are comprised of indoor and outdoor spaces for stalls, making use of the slightly cantilevered roof canopy created by the curved glulam sections. The use of glulam and glass also helps blur the boundaries between indoor and outdoor spaces.

The auditorium, offices and cafe take full advantage of the scenic river background as they are orientated towards the river and the levels are slightly elevated above the river. The public plaza in front of the auditorium serves as a multi-purpose site for a variety of events like busking, gatherings, art exhibitions. Gridded shell canopies are located across the site, creating inviting thresholds in between spaces or sheltered bus stops.

Natalee Yee Wei Tan, October 2012
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