Archive

V7 Policentric City

Problem-1

[AD2 2013]
Tower Junction close proximity to the CBD makes it an ideal area to rezone for intensified development. When researching the area it became evident that there are two key factors that were identified as problematic: the rail acts as a barrier between north and south, and the car dominates the land use. Three proposals were developed to address these issues: ‘Car[Park]’ looks at ways to connect the adjacent anchor projects through extending the road system, ‘Connect Four’ develops a scheme incorporating a grid system and a hierarchy of streets, and ‘Needle Work’ proposes a scheme that seams together the north and south sides of the railway.

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Car[Park] Lydia Ai-Un Liu, October 2013
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Connect Four Ying Yan Zhou, October 2013
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Needle Work Roberto Onat Wallace, October 2013
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[AD2 2013]
Growth projections show Halswell is facing an extremely high population growth of up to three times its current population over the next 20 years. The result is an increase from 14,680 up to 40,825 residents by the year 2030, making Halswell the fastest growing area in Christchurch. Population growth generates the requirement for more facilities such as housing, shopping, recreation etc. in order to maintain a healthy standard of living for all residents.

Approximately 87% of the existing housing stock in Halswell is composed of three bedrooms with two car garages. Halswell’s demographics show a quarter of its these three bed-room homes are occupied by a single individual. This indicates a lack of housing choice for smaller household compositions because the housing typologies are not adapting to the evident change in demographics. The demographics in Halswell also shows young couples in the future are less likely to have children, resulting in smaller families.

This project focuses on densification of the town centre complimented by a generous recreation area and housing typologies to suits smaller sized families. The team divided the centre into three porjects: ‘Voi[d]ensification’ which takes an adjacent suburban block and proposes infill residential housing; ‘Raising Halswell’ merges a housing scheme with the big box retail; and ‘Halswell’s Vein’ creates a recreation area adjacent to these two housing schemes.


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VOI[D]ENSIFICATION
Ting-Hin (Desmond) Lam, October 2013
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RAISING HALSWELL Villa (Huilin) Yan, October 2013
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HALSWELL’S VEIN Zara (Cheng) Huang, October 2013
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[AD2 2013]
Sydenham is divided east west by Brougham St, to the north are industrial warehouses and to the south is predominantly residential. Sydenham is also divided by Colombo St, which runs north south and is a busy through street connecting people in southern suburbs to the CBD. The urban strategy for this project was to mix up the industrial with the housing, and create sub-centres within Sydenham. Each centre would be identified by a local park and connected by a green path to the nearest centre, making walking and cycling the preferred form of transport within the area.

Dimitar Borislavov Penchev, Rod Ziqian Tian & Timothy James Hogarth, October 2013

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Private Space

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[AD2 2013]
Christchurch is growing, but not as a unit, it is growing as a collection of individual ‘islands’. Connecting these islands would allow the city to function more efficiently and grow as a whole. The Christchurch International Airport’s current location is disconnected from both business canters and industrial areas. This project looks at two aspects: the Cargo Connection and Passenger Connections and develops strategies to make both more efficient.

Lesley Lu Chen & Emma Suzanne Farmer, October 2013

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[AD2 2013]
Ferrymead, a major service centre, was heavily damaged in the earthquakes and lost many of the large retail shops. This study shows that Ferrymead is also a major sporting centre for Christchurch. Two proposals are developed that explore coupling services with housing and recreation. ‘The Docks’ looks to Vancouver as a model city and borrows from it the hierarchy of high, medium and low density gridded pattern and incorporates this into a dockland landscape. ‘The Water Sports Centre’ looks to Irvine and the Garden City to develop a centralised urban pattern that radiates from private to public in its land use.

Nan Wu & Owen (Wei wei) Xing, October 2013

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131025_LINWOOD-IMAGE

[AD2 2013]
Linwood suffers from low economic conditions as well as high crime rates. This proposals aims to address these issues by creating an ‘attraction’ that would bring prosperity and activity to the area. With the Avon River to the north and the estuary to the south, there is the opportunity to create a ‘Green Loop.’ This projects explores a radical idea of closing Linwood Ave to vehicle traffic and creating a woven canal and recreation landscape. The proposal goes further by exploring a radical method to intensify and densify the built fabric along the canal, integrating housing and shopping along the landscape of bridges, water ways and parks.

Huizi Suki Jiang & Xiaoming Zhang, October 2013

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ADVANCED DESIGN 2 BRIEF 2013
In both the Council’s Draft Plan and CERA’s Blueprint the defined focus has been the CBD, with 80% of the building stock lost and over 50,000 jobs displaced it is understandable. However the CBD is 6.2sqkm and accounts for only 1.3% of Christchurch’s total urban area (452sqkm). In this course we will widen the scope and look at how the city works as a whole, through which you will become familiar with the political agenda’s shaping Christchurch and develop your own critical position.

The consequence of the current political context is that while so much focus has been on developing large-scale commercial and civic projects for the city centre other critical issues have been neglected, such as the severe lack of housing. The quick fix has been to open up fringe land to build suburbs, pushing the city ever further outward. Even before the earthquakes Christchurch was a city that was expanding outwards rather than up, a product of this growth was the wider suburbs expanding reliance on malls and shopping centres. With these strategically placed economic hubs providing the majority of goods and services required by the dispersed population, the need to travel longer distances to the CBD becomes less and less – a fact reflected in the financial growth figures of the suburbs versus the CBD prior to the earthquakes. This means the future planned CBD could well suffer from the lack of people, as the quick fix for housing will draw people even further away from the CBD.

In this course we will propose ways to infill and focus local development in under utilized areas within the existing urban boundary. We will address urgent needs, question current planning policies and test alternative design solutions for the future rebuild by drawing on inherent assets within local neighborhoods. The underlying intention of the course is to propose a resilient Greater Christchurch with a primary central core surrounded by identifiable satellite hubs. To push this idea further we will investigate how local developments could be designed to respond to their context and create unique identities.

URBAN INVESTIGATION > URBAN DESIGN
The first four weeks of the course will be dedicated to an in-depth body of research into a specific location. The aim is to identify inherent properties in your chosen area and draw on them to become catalysts for a proposed development. Recognizing that each area is unique, it is encouraged to test new ideas and explore radical urban design strategies.

As we approach an era where fossil fuels are diminishing and climates changing there is a greater urgency to promote and choose lifestyles that are conscious of our environmental impact, which includes making informed choices as to how we live and work collectively. An underlying objective for this course is to design proposals for a city where resources, economies and lifestyles work in balance with one another.

Inherent in the development of the work is the ambition to develop appropriate strategies for Christchurch, ones that support the urban regeneration while at the same time contends with issues facing 21st Century urban design. This requires understanding what makes Christchurch unique within the global context.

COURSE STRUCTURE
You will work in self-selected groups of 2-3 for the duration of the course. Each team will select an area of study from a range of options to be discussed in the first day of the course. Within your team you will each take on clearly identifiable roles, which will include a body of research and a design component. Together you will develop a site investigation which will include topics such as: transport, housing, commercial, services, recreation, open space, and public space. You will be asked to critically analyze your findings to identify inherent traits and then develop relevant propositions for your area. The proposals you develop should challenge conventions of zoning and aim to provoke alternative approaches to urban developments.


ADVANCED DESIGN 2013 SCHEDULE
26.07-09.08: SITE INVESTIGATION ASSIGMENT
12.08-30.08: CONCEPT DESIGN ASSIGNMENT
30.08 MID-SEMESTER CRIT

MID-SEMESTER BREAK (Suggested Site Visit)

16.09-04.10: DESIGN DEVELOPMENT ASSIGNMENT
06.10-24.10: PRESENTATION ASSIGNMENT
25.10 FINAL CRIT